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todaysdocument:

Ten years to the day after Star Trek premieres on television (September 8, 1966), President Gerald Ford officially signs off on the name “Enterprise” for the first Space Shuttle on September 8, 1976:

ourpresidents:

To Boldly Name…

With the first space shuttle ready to be unveiled in September 1976, President Ford was asked to approve the craft’s name before meeting with NASA administrator Dr. James Fletcher. 

Fans of “Star Trek” had sent NASA hundreds of thousands of letters requesting that the space shuttle be named “Enterprise” after Captain James T. Kirk’s starship. Several of the President’s advisers also noted that the name had a long association with U.S. Navy vessels dating back to the Revolutionary War.

President Ford officially signed off on the name “Enterprise” on September 8, 1976.

View documents about the naming of the Space Shuttle “Enterprise” from the Presidential Handwriting File at http://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0047/phw19760908-01.pdf

-from the Ford Library 

smithsonianlibraries:

File under: library patrons, unusual.Our Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute library in Panama had an unexpected visitor doing some late night research in the head librarian’s office - a zariguella (aka opposum or Dedelphis marsupialis.) She was safely captured and released into the STRI arboretum but not before pawing through the collections a bit and generally making a mess of things. 
Top illustration from Biologia Centrali Americana : Mammalia
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smithsonianlibraries:

File under: library patrons, unusual.Our Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute library in Panama had an unexpected visitor doing some late night research in the head librarian’s office - a zariguella (aka opposum or Dedelphis marsupialis.) She was safely captured and released into the STRI arboretum but not before pawing through the collections a bit and generally making a mess of things. 
Top illustration from Biologia Centrali Americana : Mammalia
Zoom Info

smithsonianlibraries:

File under: library patrons, unusual.
Our Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute library in Panama had an unexpected visitor doing some late night research in the head librarian’s office - a zariguella (aka opposum or Dedelphis marsupialis.) She was safely captured and released into the STRI arboretum but not before pawing through the collections a bit and generally making a mess of things. 

Top illustration from Biologia Centrali Americana : Mammalia

The Office will not register works produced by nature, animals, or plants. Likewise, the Office cannot register a work purportedly created by divine or supernatural beings…

Examples:

• A photograph taken by a monkey.

• A mural painted by an elephant…

• An application for a song naming the Holy Spirit as the author of the work.

The US Copyright office says you can’t copyright things made by animals, gods, or ghosts (via austinkleon)
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