Librarian! Rafia!

Sep 09

todaysdocument:

Ten years to the day after Star Trek premieres on television (September 8, 1966), President Gerald Ford officially signs off on the name “Enterprise” for the first Space Shuttle on September 8, 1976:
ourpresidents:

To Boldly Name…With the first space shuttle ready to be unveiled in September 1976, President Ford was asked to approve the craft’s name before meeting with NASA administrator Dr. James Fletcher. Fans of “Star Trek” had sent NASA hundreds of thousands of letters requesting that the space shuttle be named “Enterprise” after Captain James T. Kirk’s starship. Several of the President’s advisers also noted that the name had a long association with U.S. Navy vessels dating back to the Revolutionary War.President Ford officially signed off on the name “Enterprise” on September 8, 1976.View documents about the naming of the Space Shuttle “Enterprise” from the Presidential Handwriting File at http://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0047/phw19760908-01.pdf
-from the Ford Library 

todaysdocument:

Ten years to the day after Star Trek premieres on television (September 8, 1966), President Gerald Ford officially signs off on the name “Enterprise” for the first Space Shuttle on September 8, 1976:

ourpresidents:

To Boldly Name…

With the first space shuttle ready to be unveiled in September 1976, President Ford was asked to approve the craft’s name before meeting with NASA administrator Dr. James Fletcher. 

Fans of “Star Trek” had sent NASA hundreds of thousands of letters requesting that the space shuttle be named “Enterprise” after Captain James T. Kirk’s starship. Several of the President’s advisers also noted that the name had a long association with U.S. Navy vessels dating back to the Revolutionary War.

President Ford officially signed off on the name “Enterprise” on September 8, 1976.

View documents about the naming of the Space Shuttle “Enterprise” from the Presidential Handwriting File at http://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/library/document/0047/phw19760908-01.pdf

-from the Ford Library 

Sep 05

missoulapubliclibrary:

awesomepeoplereading:

Winnie-the-Pooh reads.

Of course he does!

missoulapubliclibrary:

awesomepeoplereading:

Winnie-the-Pooh reads.

Of course he does!

(Source: bibliophilefiles, via pickeringtonlibrary)

Sep 02

“It’s a horrible irony that at the very moment the world has become more complex, we’re encouraging our young people to be highly specialized in one task.” — Why Top Tech CEOs Want Employees With Liberal Arts Degrees (via fastcompany)

(via ebookporn)

Aug 23

[video]

The Office will not register works produced by nature, animals, or plants. Likewise, the Office cannot register a work purportedly created by divine or supernatural beings…

Examples:

• A photograph taken by a monkey.

• A mural painted by an elephant…

• An application for a song naming the Holy Spirit as the author of the work.

” — The US Copyright office says you can’t copyright things made by animals, gods, or ghosts (via austinkleon)

Aug 22

gov-info:

 LOC Gov Doc: Wonder Woman For President
Wonder Woman, no. 7, Winter 1943. DC Comics, Inc. Copyright deposit. Serial and Government Publications Division.

gov-info:

LOC Gov Doc: Wonder Woman For President

Wonder Woman, no. 7, Winter 1943. DC Comics, Inc. Copyright deposit. Serial and Government Publications Division.

food52:

We prefer these lyrics. No offense, Sir Elton.
(via huffposttaste)

food52:

We prefer these lyrics. No offense, Sir Elton.

(via huffposttaste)

(Source: bradengraeber, via noeatinginthelibrary)

Aug 21

mage-cat:

hafuboti:

You can get the individual boxes here.

I hope I remember these exist come next summer.

mage-cat:

hafuboti:

You can get the individual boxes here.

I hope I remember these exist come next summer.

(via inthelibrarywithacomicbook)

Aug 20

[video]

Aug 19

Twitter was also affected by algorithmic filtering. “Ferguson” did not trend in the US on Twitter but it did trend locally. [I’ve since learned from @gilgul that that it *briefly* trended but mostly trended at localities.] So, there were fewer chances for people not already following the news to see it on their “trending” bar. Why? Almost certainly because there was already national, simmering discussion for many days and Twitter’s trending algorithm (said to be based on a method called “term frequency inverse document frequency”) rewards spikes… So, as people in localities who had not been talking a lot about Ferguson started to mention it, it trended there though the national build-up in the last five days penalized Ferguson.

Algorithms have consequences.

What happens to #Ferguson affects what happens to Ferguson.

” — What Happens to #Ferguson Affects Ferguson: Net Neutrality, Algorithmic Filtering and Ferguson